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clouetvis:

* * * by *TatianaB* on Flickr.
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jenkatdollsnfurryfriends:

untitled by *Ray.S* on Flickr.
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madelynchok:

Amethyst from Ringdoll :)

(via dolls-in-wonderland)

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andawarudoichi:

Drachen by Amadiz on Flickr.
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valandraa:

Dollfete 2014 (30.03.14) by aya&ume on Flickr.
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kyophile:

unholy ghost

And on Easter morning, our unholy one arose from slumber.

And promptly went back to sleep. /facepalm

(via patchworkdandy)

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truebjdconfessions:

I don’t understand how even several years old Minifees can get over $200 on the MP. There’s too damn many of them for that to feel like a reasonable price for me. Welp, I guess I get to wait a bit longer for a price I’m willing to pay for the Ford Escort of the hobby.

~Anonymous

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Anonymous asked: Problem with recasting, the recast companies don't discriminate between big and small BJD companies, they just want money. So if you buy from them, you're funding their next theft, which could be a big company or a tiny one-artist company. Plus, even "big" BJD companies are usually like 10 people max, and a lot of them are getting seriously hurt by recasts.

malaryush-dolls:

armin-blood-covered:

The part I really don’t like is when companies go after brand-new companies and steal from them. I get that recasting is stealing, and that the big companies might not actually be that big. But then I remember that the big companies steal from the smaller, newer companies as well (remember that whole Leekeworld stealing an entire doll design from Dust of Dolls?) and they get away with it. That makes me not feel quite so bad about them being stolen from in turn. Then again, I have a very odd sense of morality, it seems.

Another thing I’ve seen is that people like to buy recasts when they have a huge mod to do, and simply want an inexpensive base, but only certain sculpts work for what they’re picturing. Put yourself in their shoes for a moment. If you were planning a mod which cost hundreds of dollars itself, and had the option to buy, say, a SOOM Euclase for $748 or a recast of the same doll for a fraction of that price, would you really want to fork over the near $800? I highly doubt it. And I wouldn’t blame you.

Is there any way we can look at recasts on a case-by-case basis? At least with limited dolls, like SOOM’s monthly dolls. After they stop selling them, they’re done, aside from a sale or two where you can buy parts. At that point, wouldn’t buying a recast of a doll like Euclase be similar to buying him secondhand?

I mean, a good chunk of sculpts from these companies are, honestly, over priced by a lot. I keep saying SOOM because I’ve been out of the hobby for a while and I’m rusty on companies ORZ

Not that anon, but many things are problematic with this reply.

Firstly, a company borrowing an idea and expanding upon it, to work toward their own original creation is in no way the same as manufacturing direct copies of someone else’s work.  They are two completely different issues - and while you may not be personally comfortable with where the line falls on inspiration, counterfeiting is very clearly over that line.

Secondly, the “put yourself in their shoes” idea has been used repeatedly by people who support counterfeiting, but it falls flat by turning a blind eye to reality  People who support artists and are against recasting are likely already in those same situations.  There are many people who oppose recasts who like to modify their dolls, including very large, dramatic projects. But since wanting to pursue a project should not trump an artist’s right to make a living, people suck it up and pay to get that perfect doll, find a less expensive, legitimately-produced alternative that can work out, or accept that the project isn’t within their means. You may “highly doubt it” but you would be mistaken, as people do modify legit dolls all the time. 

Thirdly, no, buying a recast of a LE doll is in no way like buying secondhand.  (Again, an argument that has been refuted repeatedly throughout the recast debate.)  For your particular example, Soom re-releases their LE dolls in a variety of forms, including their SO releases and Free Choice events, so recasts actually do cut into their business and compete directly with them for sales.  Even if they decided to never release a particular sculpt again, it is their choice, their right to make that decision.  They are the only ones who have the right to control their product, their intellectual property, and the only ones with the right to profit from it. 

And, of course, there’s that point the original anon made - ordering from a recaster is still directly, financially supporting criminals and giving them the funds needed to continue stealing from and harming other businesses.

There is no excuse to support recasting.  You can look at it case by case all you like, but it’s still unacceptable in all of those cases.

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andawarudoichi:

Camael & Berial by nobodyhan on Flickr.
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truebjdconfessions:

"I want to be popular and loved in the hobby!" Are we still in middle school? You’ll never have true happiness if you’re basing your enjoyment of the hobby and self worth on the opinions of others.

~Anonymous